Good Morning- Kanye West

February 24, 2010 at 1:53 am (Daily Offerings, Music, video) (, , , )

Good morning, Orange… It’s time to find my way…

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The People [Original]- Common (prod. Kanye West)

February 17, 2010 at 1:03 pm (Music, video) (, , , , )

The People [Original]- Common (prod. Kanye West)

The artwork is by Draw Heat… The music is by Common… even the hook…

Say word to 2DB for dropping wisdom on a Wednesday afternoon…

Final cut of the song below…


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Knock on Wood- J. Cole

February 17, 2010 at 12:44 pm (Music) (, , , , , , )

Covering Common’s “Go” featuring Black Cardless John Mayer… Cole goes in…

Download Knock On Wood- J. Cole

Original…


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B.o.B May 25th Mixtape Download

February 1, 2010 at 12:00 pm (Daily Offerings, Mixtape, Music) (, , , , , , , , , , )

It’s here peoples…the appetizer before the main course… May 25th mixtape…

Download here… Shout outs to all parties involved from B Rich, to TJ, to B.o.B, to 2DB…

Review by The Journalist coming soon…

Fav 5:

“Gladiators”- B.o.B ft. J.Cole (prod. The Alchemist)

“Fuck the Money”-B.o.B ft. Asher Roth (prod. Kanye West)

“Fool for Love”-B.o.B ft. Charles Hamilton (prod. B.o.B)

“Out of time”-B.o.B (prod. B.o.B)

“Don’t Feel So Good”-B.o.B (prod. B.o.B)

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Crazy- Aura ft. Clipse (prod. Kanye West)

January 30, 2010 at 10:11 am (Daily Offerings, Music) (, , , , )

Some days, we all feel like getting away… Have a good day…

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They Say- Common ft. Kanye West (AOL Sessions)

January 28, 2010 at 11:32 am (Music, video) (, , , , )

Have a good day… and don’t worry about what they say…

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What It Is- Kanye West (Not So New Demo)

January 23, 2010 at 10:13 am (Music) (, , , )

What It Is- Kanye West (Demo)

This is not done yet… so hold on and shout outs to 2BZ

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Sunshine to the Rain- Miri Ben Ari ft. Scarface & Anthony Hamilton

January 22, 2010 at 7:42 am (Daily Offerings, Music) (, , , , , , )

It’s time to put in that work to get through this… Have a good fifth day…

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A Perfect Interview with Bryant Stewart

January 9, 2010 at 1:57 pm (interview, Music) (, , , , , , , , , )

20-year-old Bryant Stewart is St. Louis' freshest artist.

Once he was handed that Ludacris CD, Bryant Stewart’s dreams were centered on being the witty, yet introspective voice of new school Hip-Hop.

Stewart grew up in a middle class household in the often vilified city of St. Louis, which is known for ruffian behavior and various criminal acts.

Despite not being caught up in the grittiness of the streets, Stewart still faced his own difficulties. Shortly after receiving the gift of a karaoke machine in the eighth grade and beginning to record himself as a rapper,  Stewart lost both of his grandparents and witnessed his parents divorce. Those events, in the span of a few years, drained a young Stewart and put a slump on his musical aspirations.

But determined not to sit back and waste away, he picked up the mike again and started to make his move.

Now, Stewart is set on signing an indie deal. He is putting out his next mixtape Interpersonal Love on Valentine’s Day, which will feature more of his singing abilities. He is also representing IM KING clothing line. And this summer, we can expect an album from him that is set to be a “classic,” according to the man himself.

But before any of that is set in stone, Stewart called The Journalist in order to delve into St. Louis’ music, his movement, and his competition.

The Journalist: Explain to the people where you’re from and how you got into making the music that you make that is

"Me coming into this, I’m very hungry."

outside the realm of the Nelly’s and the Chingy’s, and the other rappers that have come from St. Louis.

Bryant Stewart: Ever since I was about 11 or 12, I really started paying attention to the music scene; it seemed like everything was repetitive. It seemed like everything that the artists that were new out of St. Louis were doing, somebody did it before them.

And I never wanted to be the type of person that did anything that somebody else did. I always had the mindset of bringing about something new. People tend to grav[itate] toward something that’s a new concept, so I wanted to make music that was different to what you normally hear out of St. Louis. Because to me, that would make somebody turn their heads faster than if I made a club song or a dance track—something that you know would come out St. Louis.

The Journalist: You are something different. How does that affect you in your home state… in your home city?

Bryant Stewart: It’s kind of a gamble here, because people are so tuned in to that one type of sound. If you bring something new, they’re hesitant to take it in or hesitant to listen.

I think it’s like anything new. If they were to take the Arch down tomorrow people would complain for a while. But if they put something in its place, ten years later, people would eventually conform to it—okay, that’s the new monument for St. Louis.

The Journalist: You came out recently with a mixtape called A Perfect Change and you had an introduction video to it.

Can you explain to us the introduction video and how you came up with your mixtape title?

Bryant Stewart: There’s different reasons why you see different things in the video. If you go back and look at the video, I’m walking through an upscale neighborhood, because traditionally if you see a St. Louis artist, they’re always in the inner city or urban areas of St. Louis.

It’s kinda like when they show us the kids in Africa, the kids that are starving. Americans start to get that mindset that all of Africa is like that, but it’s really not like that. So I didn’t want anybody to get the mindset that all St. Louis is an inner city, urbanized area, because it’s really not like that. We have upscale places as well.

Two, the video is in black and white. I didn’t want put any color in there, so your only focal point would be me. And you would actually have to listen what I’m saying, the whole speech about society as a whole and not just music.

And that kinda derives from the mixtape, A Perfect Change. Here in St. Louis, the sound is so much different than what I’m making. So if I want to get people to listen to something else, I have to change their mindset. So I wanted to bring about that perfect change, something that everyone could listen to, yet it was different.

The Journalist: How did that whole project come about with you doing the remix to XV’s “Me, You” featuring Freddie Gibbs and Shawn Chrystopher?

Bryant Stewart: I’m like you got Indiana, you got Wyoming, you got Inglewood, I’m like they’re leaders of the new school. But we are definitely missing the movement that I’m trying to bring in here. And so, without I asking them, I’m throwing a verse on there–I don’t care.

I want everybody to hear what I have to say, from my city. So I threw a verse on there and it started to pick up. A sometimes  I forget what an impact A Perfect Change has, because as soon as I put it on my twitter, blogs started to pick it up.

It kinda the unofficial remix to the remix.

The Journalist: How did that sample for “When It Rains” come about? And what does that song mean to you?

Bryant Stewart: As you know, we’re slowly but surely coming out of a recession. I’m kind of the go to guy with my friends, if they have a problem.

“When It Rains” kinda derives from, sure we’ll have rainy days and things will seem all bad, but that’s what umbrellas are made for. Umbrellas are made to shield us from the rain. It’s a metaphor song, as if you’re having a bad day, just get your umbrella and keep going.

If you’re hoping for the best, it can only get better. Things can’t stay the same for a long period of time. There has to be change somewhere along the line. And I just wanted to make a track that everybody could gravitate toward and listen to. Even when you’re feeling bad, you can listen to it, and hopefully if you hear my voice it might uplift you and say, “The day doesn’t have to be this bad.”

The Journalist: When I listened to A Perfect Change in full. I thought you had a Drake sound with lyrics closer to Kanye from College Dropout.

Drake (left) and Kanye West (right) are the headliners of Rap's fresh sound.

Is that what you’re trying to do—bring the intellectual to the party scene?

Bryant Stewart: It’s just the way my style is; I didn’t do it intentionally. If I had came out before Drake, it would have been flip flopped like Drake, you sound like Bryant Stewart.

I remember in ’06, the clothing company that I used to work for was conducting interviews. So I did an interview with Drake. And I remember listening to his music and his raps. And I was like that sounds pretty cool. Then I heard he sings, I’m like, “Are you kidding me?” I’m like definitely if he gets mainstream somewhere along the line, they’re definitely going to be comparing us. So I was like okay, whatever.


Then three years later– BOOM, [there’s] this big Drake explosion. So I don’t let it affect me, because I knew coming into this that those comparisons were going to be flying everywhere.

And I think with the College Dropout sound that is true as far as the lyrics, cuz if you listen to College Dropout, you can hear that hunger in his voice. And as he’s gone through different things since College Dropout; he can’t really rap about those things. He can’t really have that hunger. The hunger’s over; he’s more than full right now.

Me coming into this, I’m very hungry. And you can hear that hunger in my lyrics.

The Journalist

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Kanye Is Back…

January 3, 2010 at 9:47 am (Entertainment, Music, News) (, , )

Peep the message from his blog below:

FIRST OF ALL, I WANT TO THANK EVERYBODY FOR THEIR CONSTANT LOVE AND SUPPORT OVER THESE PAST 6 YEARS! I’M SO HAPPY TO BE BACK IN THE STUDIO MAKING NEW MUSIC. I WILL BRING YOU THE BEST I HAVE TO OFFER WITH THE SAME DEDICATION THAT KOBE HAS ON THE COURT. IT’S FUNNY HOW SO MANY RAPPERS GET WORSE AS THEIR CAREERS STRETCH OUT BUT TRUE POETS GET BETTER. WE WILL FOLLOW IN THE FOOTSTEPS OF MAYA ANGELOU, GILL SCOTT HERRON AND NINA SIMONE. THEIR WORK IMPROVED WITH TIME. THEY DOCUMENTED WHAT WAS HAPPENING IN CULTURE. THAT IS OUR RESPONSIBILITY AS THE MODERN DAY ARTISTS AND POETS, TO ACCURATELY REPRESENT WHAT IS HAPPENING NOW, SO WHEN THE POWERS THAT BE TRY TO REWRITE HISTORY YOU CAN ALWAYS LOOK AT OUR WORKS AND FIND TRUTH AND SINCERITY IN A WORLD OF PROCESSED INFORMATION. LET US SOAK IN POSITIVE FORCES AND LOOK DOWN ON UPON THOSE WHO MASQUERADE AS TRUTH TELLERS AND OBJECTIVE FACT GIVERS WHEN IN REALITY EVERYTHING THAT IS PROJECTED HAS AN AGENDA OF BRAINWASHING US, THE “CONSUMER”, THE PUBLIC, TO BELIEVE WHAT THEY WANT US TO. LET US LOOK PAST HEADLINES AND DEAL WITH JUST A BIT OF REALITY IN THIS NEW DECADE. WE HAVE OUR OWN OUTLETS NOW. WE DON’T HAVE TO BELIEVE EVERYTHING ANYMORE. NOW I’LL FIGURE OUT A WAY TO MAKE THAT RYHME LOL!!!

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A Sample of Exile

December 19, 2009 at 11:44 am (Music, Uncategorized) (, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , )

Aleksander Manfredi (bka Exile) beautifully mixes soul and fun into each beat

Exile, an LA native, puts his feet into each soulful production that he cooks up. And whether it’s rapping with Aloe Blacc or executive producing for Blame One, Exile is everywhere, most likely doing everything and anything to hook in listeners.

He is best known for his layered soulful samples that hearken back to sampling gurus like DJ Premier, Jam Master Jay, DJ Jazzy Jeff, the late J Dilla, Madlib, Jon Brion who co-produced Late Registration with sampling aficionado Kanye West. All with their own unique sound just like Exile.

Below The Heavens with West Coast gem Blu had and has the underground rumbling for more.

Recently, Exile hooked up with Fashawn for Boy Meets World, who in turn hooked me up with Exile for an interview.

The Journalist: I want to know how you’re able to find the samples that you’re able to find, and how you flip them so nicely.

Exile: I just basically just try to find inspiration to bang out as many beats as I can. If I don’t find it, I just force myself. I don’t know; it’s just what I do. I don’t know how to explain it.

The Journalist: What you mean, “just what you do?” What you Michael Jordan; you just get on the court—“I’m just that good.”?

(laughter)

Exile: It’s all different; sometimes I just start off with some drums or grab a random record. Sometimes I just sit around and listen to music all day till I find something that inspires me. Or sometimes I just lay down a baseline and try to find something that works with that. There’s many different ways to go about it.

The Journalist: The one I need to ask you a question about is “You Are Now in The Clouds With The Koochie Monstas” (Below The Heavens). How did that come about? Because that was a dope beat, I thought Blu was going to actually rap to that.

Exile: Oh, actually we had the song “Below the Heavens,” and we just knew we wanted to have live instrumentation to fade out the whole record.

The Koochie Monstas is a mixture of these different musicians that we know and shit. Blu gathered a lot of it together and we just made it work. And being keen with the hook we had from Miguel (Jontel). And we just blended all together and talked some shit over it, and it just worked out perfect.

So that was actually live instrumentation.

The Journalist: Was that Blu beatboxing or was that you?

Exile: No, that was me beatboxing.

The Journalist: What don’t you do? You rap. You produce. You beatbox.

Exile: I can play the drums… the accordion.

The Journalist: Are we going to see you dancing soon?

Exile: Uh… I got a dope cabbage patch.

The Journalist: I saw you doing a little bit of a dance move in the “Blu Collar (Workers)” video with Blu.

(laughter)


Exile: Yeah. I got iller ones.

The Journalist: What can we expect from the future projects?

Exile: As of right now, I have my rap album finished. The album with Aloe Blacc’s finished…

The Journalist: (interjecting) Your album? What’s the name of your album?

Exile: My album is called A Four-Track Mind. Basically, everything was recorded on a four-track, all analog tapes. It’s a look into Exile’s head, from some funny shit, to like some emcee shit, to a lot of personal shit. I think people should enjoy it. A lot of it I did without writing—in my head shit.

The Journalist: The Aloe Blacc album. How’s that looking?

Exile: Me and Aloe have a group called Emanon. And yeah it’s (the album’s) basically done. I’m just in the process of mixing it and fine tuning it. That’s going to be called A Bird’s Eye View.

The Journalist: When can we expect that?

Exile: 2010.

There’s also this record that I executive produced by Blame One (Days Chasing Days).

I’m working with this musician called J.O.H.A.Z. Me and him have a group together called Dag Savage.

And I’m working with this emcee out of Chicago named Ahdad. Yeah, I got my hands full.

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